Sleep for Free, Worldwide!


We all want to know how to travel for free or at least for cheap.  Major trip costs are transportation and accommodation. I’m sure you already know about free flights and cheap flight hacks.   On to free sleeping!

Free Accommodation for Budget Travelers

I once traveled so penniless I could only afford to sleep in a bed a few times a week.  Purchasing a bus ticket blew my budget so badly I had to survive for days on avocados.

So why do I think sleeping for free is the best part of cheap travel?  The options usually lead to deep cultural connections and build your character!

Remember, there’s no free lunch.  What you save in money, you pay in time it take to participate in the alternatives.  Here are ten free accommodation options to help you travel around the world on a budget:

1. Couchsurfing

Couchsurfing makes travel accessible by connecting those willing to welcome strangers to their couches with people who can’t afford to stay in hotels all the time.  Even better – you’ll get out of your guidebook and see your destination through the eyes of a local.

Be successful: set up a profile today, and start hosting people in your home.  You’re more likely to be accepted by hosts on your trip if you’ve already given to and have references in the CS community.  You’ll also develop your people-reading skills – the key to using Couchsurfing safely.  Fill out your profile thoughtfully and thoroughly.  Remember CS is about what you can *give* – great cultural connection, not what you can get – cheap travel.  Best and worst experiences in this article. awhich I found by responding to a media call-out for stories – they published one of mine!

Other websites like Couchsurfing:
BeWelcome
Hospitality Club
Global Freeloaders
Staydu
SERVAS

2. Language Exchanges

Whether you connect with an individual through a platform like TalkTalkBnB or sign up to a program like Diverbo in Spain or Germany, you’re swapping your English skills for a place to lay your head.

Be successful:  Make a great profile or get familiar with the application process.  Again, you’re not getting something for nothing.  It’s about trading something other than money for a place to get your beauty rest.  It’s an opportunity for the type of friendship you’re unlikely to forge with a hotel clerk.

3. Work Exchanges

This is my absolute favorite way to travel, and not because it saves money.  Many global wanderers tire quickly of museums and waterfalls.  They begin to miss home comforts and a sense of purpose that comes with responsibility to others.  Especially in expensive countries, trading four hours a day to help someone else accomplish their goals is a rewarding, no-cost way to experience another culture.  For more benefits, see the Work Exchange FAQs.

My favorite site is Workaway: the affordable membership lasts two years and covers the entire world.  Much of the work is physical and outdoors, but lots of hosts are looking for less physical indoor work as well.

Be successful: make a great profile and work hard.  Hosts are giving just as much as you are.  It takes plenty of time and energy to respond to messages, organize arrivals and departures, prepare space for you, incorporate you in daily-life planning, and show you their corner of the world.

Other programs like Workaway:
HelpX
WWOOF
HippoHelp

Caretaker Gazette
Viva Farms 
Many hostels have work trade programs as well.

4. Housesitting

Housesitting is a fantastic way to combine the stability of routine with the adventure of travel.  You give your time taking care of an owner’s home (and usually pets!) in exchange for an opportunity to settle down for a bit and really explore an area.

Be successful:  Housesit before you hit the road so you’ll have references and a sense of what housesitting entails.  A great profile goes a long way.  It’s free to look, but you do have to pay for a membership to contact homeowners.  The fee is worth it even if you get just a single house sitting job.  For a detailed guide, read How to Become a House Sitter.

The most common house sitting websites are:
HouseCarers  –  international (I’m writing this while house sitting at a home I found on HouseCarers!)
Trusted Housesitters –  international
Mind my House – international

See the Best (and Worst) House Sitting Websites for an extensive list of house sitting websites.

5. Home Exchanges

Just because you have a mortgage doesn’t mean you can’t travel!  Home exchanges are a great way to see a new destination at a significantly reduced cost.  Finding direct swaps isn’t as hard as you might think, given many homeowners will want to travel at the same time you do – holidays and summer!

Be Successful: A great profile goes a long way toward matching you with like-minded homeowners.  The more you can plan in advance, the better!

Sites:
HomeExchange.com
Home for Exchange
Christian Home Exchange 
(<- this link gives Half the Clothes readers a 25% discount)

6. Overnight Buses/Trains

Who said you have to sleep in a bed?!  On my most thread-bare, shoe-string travel, I regularly took night transit.

Be successful: if your destination isn’t the final stop, set an alarm to wake yourself about 20-30 minutes before predicted arrival.  If you can communicate with the driver/staff, ask them to wake you in the right town.  Make sure your most precious belongings are secure – the overhead compartment is not a great place for your passport, wallet, phone, camera, etc.  I usually use my bag of valuables as a pillow.

7. Sleep in Airports

If the people you’ll be interacting with after your flight can handle the jet-lagged, sleep-deprived version of you, great!  Arrive at the airport the night before to save on hotels.  Or, if you arrive late, stay the rest of the night in the airport before setting out to secure a resting spot the next morning.

Be successful: Again – you’ll need an alarm if you’re catching a flight.  And you’ll need to secure your belongings.  I use my valuables bag as a pillow connect my main bag to my body somehow.  Another great reason to pack light!

8. Homeless Style

When my budget was really, really thin my travel partner and I decided to go to the bus station the night before our departure and take turns sleeping there.  Turns out we weren’t the only ones.  Tons of traveling locals had the same idea.  There are lots of public places where sleeping is acceptable.

Be successful: there are also public places where sleeping is not acceptable (or legal!).  Know the laws where you are traveling to avoid trouble with the police.  Don’t be a burden – especially if your appearance makes it easy to see you’re a foreigner.  If you’re the only one sleeping in a gorgeous park frequented by after-dinner walkers in a city you have the privilege of traveling to, move yourself along.

9. Camping

Depending on your destination and the delicacy of your constitution, free camping options are a realistic cheap travel solution in many places.  Let’s start with the obvious: free campgrounds.  Next: farmers will often give permission to sleep on their land.  In Scandanavia, you don’t even have to ask: it’s considered a basic right.  In the US, you can camp free in National Forests.  Similarly, Canada’s Crown Land – 88% of the country – can be camped on for free.  Japan has lots of free camping, as does Australia along their endless coastline and empty outback.  Note that many of these countries have a reputation for being out of reach to the budget traveler.  Where there’s a will, there’s a way!

If you have to pay to camp, this friend referral link for HipCamp – like AirBnb for camping – will cut your cost by $20.

Be successful: If you’re camping near farms or towns, follow the homeless sleeping tips: know the laws; be respectful.  If you’re keen for a wilderness experience, try camping at home first.  Learn to set up a tent, get familiar with ideal foods, know the importance of a sleeping pad (it’s not for squishy comfort; it insulates you from the ground and makes a huuuuuge difference in preventing hypothermia).

10. Sleep in Your Car

Yes, this requires that you have a car.  I couldn’t decide if this option fit better on the “Travel Cheap by Sleeping for Free” list or the upcoming “Travel Cheap by Sleeping Cheap” list.  I traveled for a year in New Zealand, sleeping in a van for at least 30% of the nights I was in the country.  Yeah, that’s right.  I lived in a van.  I lived in a truck, too, travelling across the U.S. with my Aussie beau, bedding down each night in the back of a Toyota Tundra.

Be successful: Start with a mechanically sound vehicle.  Be really respectful about where you park.  No one likes unfamiliar van people parked in front of their house, especially if they sleep in until noon or string up clotheslines up in public parks.  In the USA, Wal*Mart parking lots welcome you.  I’ve read gas stations in Mexico do as well.  You can try to stay in other parking lots, dead-end roads, and sometimes industrial areas.

Hope these free accommodation tips help you on your quest travel cheaply around the world!

What do I do when not sleeping for free?  AirBnb.  Almost always.  It’s an affordable way to be “at home” when traveling, which keeps me sane.  This friend referral link gives you $40 off your first stay.

Happy Traveling! ♣

Stretch your dollars further!  Check out:

And when the money runs out, you’ll want:

References   [ + ]

a. which I found by responding to a media call-out for stories – they published one of mine!


15 comments

  • September 26, 2016 at 9:39 pm

    This is awesome! Bookmarked it! Some websites I already know like couchsurfing and help but there are lots more I only discovered now. Thanks for the helpful compilation!

  • September 26, 2016 at 4:09 pm

    Great list! I often host Couchsurfers and I love it. I’ve made lifelong friends from my guests.

  • September 26, 2016 at 2:15 pm

    This is a great post with loads of info and links. Awesome. I am saving this post. Although I’ve slept in the airport and on a train, I prefer a room. It definitely does not need to be a 5 star hotel, Airbnb is totally fine. Saving money is one thing and I don’t mind cutting expenses but I will always spend money good shoes and a good bed. Your on you feet most of the time and in your bed the rest if the time. I hate trying to explore a city exhausted from not sleeping ok

    • September 26, 2016 at 3:42 pm

      Glad you enjoyed it! I know what you mean about the good sleep. If you can afford it, I certainly recommend it. I’ve “wasted” entire days at destinations recovering from not having enough sleep on the way there. It’s great for budget travelers who are willing to slow down to consider work exchanging and house sitting, hey. Happy travels!

  • September 26, 2016 at 2:07 am

    Free accommodation is definitely the easiest way to cut back on travel expenses, and get to experience the local culture more!

  • September 25, 2016 at 10:17 pm

    I would really love to housesit one day. I am not into sleeping in my own car but some other tips are great- thanks for reminding me to check out the housesitting thing 🙂

    • September 25, 2016 at 10:59 pm

      I’ve slept in a car, van, and truck… I can say the car is the hardest and most uncomfortable. Van is the most comfortable, but figuring out where you’ll end up all night is a challenge!

      House sitting is great – I’ve seen so many cool places thanks to it!

  • September 25, 2016 at 8:55 pm

    Lots of great options for budget traveling. Good for when you need to get creative to stretch your budget.

    • September 25, 2016 at 10:59 pm

      I’m pretty much always stretching my budget! 😉

  • September 25, 2016 at 3:01 pm

    There are so many great websites I didn’t know about!! Currently exploring Culture Go Go. Indeed there are so many opportunities to travel on a budget) Thank you for sharing!

  • September 25, 2016 at 3:36 am

    Wow this is an interesting roundup of ways to travel without spending any money! Have you really slept in a bus station? That’s pretty brave! House sitting and home exchanges are getting pretty popular too.

    • September 25, 2016 at 10:27 pm

      Yup – accidentally under-budgeted for a trip and had to come up with some pretty creative solutions. We got permission to string our hammocks in the yard of a hostel, regularly slept in shifts at bus stations, and loved the few all-inclusive experiences that included three square meals and a bed every night. Being stretched so thin taught me a lot about what it’s actually like to be homeless and made me a lot more compassionate.

  • September 25, 2016 at 1:05 am

    Of all of these, I have willingly camped and taken an overnight train. And I have unwillingly slept in my car and at an airport. Haven’t tried the others though. I’ll give some thought to housesitting

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